BEWARE: Things You Should Never Share on Social Media

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10 things you should never share on social media

By Kevin Magee | Posted: November 12, 2013

Social media is all about transparency. It’s about sharing and being your authentic self. Uh-huh.Well, there are some things you should probably keep to yourself.

Here are 10 of them:

1. Your phone number.

There are creepy, disturbed people on the Internet with ill intentions and bad manners. They are called telemarketers. Don’t feed them—especially after midnight. It’s sort of like “Gremlins.”

2. Pictures of your credit card.

Yes, people actually do this. I know you’re proud of your new VISA card branded with the Toronto Maple Leafs logo, but showing it off on Instagram is like asking for identity theft.

3. Pictures of any bodily function.

I know where you think I’m going with this, but I’m not. I’m talking about potty training. This is one instance where “take a picture or it didn’t happen” doesn’t apply.

4. This video:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dQw4w9WgXcQ

5. An invitation for someone to rob you.

Letting the one-sixth of the human population that is on Facebook know you’re in Mexico this week while that brand new 60-inch TV you posted about last week is home alone is an invitation for someone to rob you.

6. Vague posts.

“Wondering why …”

Me too. Unfollow.

7. Your password.

This should be at the top of the no-brainer pile. If your password is the name of your cat who has a Facebook account with 1,632 friends, you either need to change your password or the name of your cat.

8. Anything that happened in Vegas.

This is a rule for a reason.

9. Your Klout score, or any other social media statistic.

If you post your Klout score, you’re clearly over compensating for something.

This leads to the final thing you should never share on social media:

10. A naked photo.

If you’re an A-list celebrity taking nude pictures of yourself with your iPhone for your PR firm to leak to the media, that’s fine. Otherwise, not cool.

http://www.prdaily.com/Main/Articles/15522.aspx

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10 candy hearts with your favorite jargon

By | Posted: February 15, 2013

Remember those candy hearts you handed out to your classmates on Valentine’s Day—the ones with playful sayings such as “Be Mine” and “Let’s Kiss”?

It was an early lesson in flirting. Too bad the hearts were too saccharine to enjoy.

Now that you’re all grown up and in the working world, you need a new kind of candy heart—a treat you can give to the person in your life who adores jargon.

You need jargon candy hearts.

 

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http://www.prdaily.com/Main/Articles/13848.aspx

 

Journalists identify the worst PR jargon

By Gini Dietrich | Posted: January 17, 2013

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My colleagues and I used to write down the dumb corporate language we’d hear, putting the words and phrases on a six-foot whiteboard in the office kitchen.

In little time, terms such as “at the end of the day,” “with all due respect,” “frankly,” and “win win” became the top culprits.

In fact, we filled up that whiteboard and added big sheets of poster paper on either side to keep the game going.

MBAs and wannabe executives were often the ones uttering these mind-numbing words, but they’re not the only professionals who speak this language.

According to a report by twelve thirty eight, PR professionals are the worst at using buzzwords that have no real meaning. Each year, the firm surveys 500 journalists to find out which buzzwords, jargon, and terms PR pros use when working with them.

The survey taps British reporters and editors from media outlets such as the BBC, The Telegraph, the Financial Times, the Daily Mail, and more.

The results of the survey revealed what twelve thirty eight calls the “hipsterization” of PR terminology, exemplified by the rise of words such as “awesome” and “super excited.” I have a journalist friend who shares this feeling; she’s fed up with “amazing” (which, of course, makes me use it every other word when I email her).

Journalists in the U.K. also bemoaned the influx of American terminology, including “circle back” or “reach out.”

Twelve thirty eight compiled this list of the top 20 buzzwords identified in the survey. The words and phrases in parenthesis are an attempt to define the meaning.

1. Issues (problems)
2. Dynamic (likely not to be)
3. Paradigm (a “silk purse” word)
4. Elite (you wouldn’t normally get to attend)
5. Hotly anticipated (never heard of it)
6. End-user (customer)
7. Influencer (a person who probably doesn’t have influence)
8. Evangelist (a tendency to tweet with loads of hashtags)
9. Deliverables (tasks)
10. Icon/iconic (use before 01.01.01 or never)
11. Rocketed (made modest progress)
12. “An astonishing x per cent” (it rarely is astonishing)
13. Marquee event/marquee client (probably “very local”)
14. Going forward (in the future)
15. Ongoing (a bit behind schedule)
16. Optimized (changed by consultants then changed back)
17. Horizontal, vertical, etc. (two words in lieu of a strategy)
18. Phygital (easy to press or swipe, we guess)
19. SoLoMo (no idea)
20. Well-positioned (hopeful but a bit scared)

And one of my very favorites: I loathe it when a business is described as “providing solutions.” We see this time and again and it tells us nothing.

A field guide to social media zombies

By | Posted: November 1, 2012

As Zombie Preparedness Month draws to a close, it’s critical that we spotlight the brain-eaters lurking in our midst—the ones on social media.

The U.K.-based price comparison website Confused.com has bravely taken on this assignment, compiling various social media zombies into an infographic to make them easily identifiable.

For instance, there’s the “foodie zombie,” who you’ll find carefully snapping pictures of a plate of food, then cropping those images and applying the perfect Instagram filter so it earns as many “likes” as possible.

There’s also the check-in zombie, who, thankfully, is the easiest one to avoid, because he lets you know his exact location: “At Starbucks, ordering my usual blonde roast with braiiiiiiiins.”

Don’t get cornered by any of these monsters. Check out the full infographic:

social-media-zombies

10 (mostly) free social media tools you can’t live without

By Samantha Hosenkamp | Posted: October 12, 2012
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Please excuse any typos. This is a live conference blog. Social media pros, you’re surrounded by tools. And no, I’m not talking about those Twitter trolls and aggressive Facebook commenters. New tools are created every day. How do you determine which are worth exploring?

Pete Codella, (@Codella on Twitter), VP of marketing and PR for Alexander’s, a Utah-based full-service traditional and digital marketing communications firm, has some suggestions.

He shared his top tools for social media success at our Social Media and Community Managers Summit in Chicago:

Monitor your brand

People are talking about your company. Are you listening?

SocialMention

  • Track and measure what people are saying about your company.
  • Monitor Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Digg, Google and many more.

Google Alerts

  • Receive email alerts about your brand, topics of interest and more.

SEO

HubSpot’s Marketing Grader

  • Measure your marketing activities.
  • Find out how your website ranks.
  • Find out how competing websites rank.

Track your tweets

Topsy

  • Get realtime insights from Twitter conversations.
  • Search links, tweets, photos, videos, what’s trending and more.

Twello

  • No, not the Dutch province of Gelderland.
  • Find users in a specific locations based on their Twitter bios.

Facebook

Involver (paid plans available, too)

  • Add branded applications to your Facebook fan page.
  • Has additional paid and free apps for other channels.

ShortStack (paid plans available, too)

  • Design Facebook Apps and contests.

Pinterest

Pingraphy

  • Schedule pins on Pinterest.
  • Analyze metrics.
  • Upload pins in bulk.

PinPuff

  • Calculate the measure of your popularity on Pinterest and value of each pin.

Video

Grovo (paid plans available, too)

  • Online video training site that teaches you social media tricks and tips through quick videos.
  • A great way to strengthen your team’s understanding of social media.

http://www.prdaily.com/Main/Articles/12897.aspx

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