Not a bad way to start a Friday…Starbucks and a webinar with Guy Kawasaki!

 

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Coffee Drinking Statistics

Statistic Verification
Source: Live Sciene, Coffee 4 Dummies, Coffee Research
Date Verified: 5.6.2013
Coffee is a brewed beverage with a strong flavor prepared from the roasted seeds of the coffea plant. The beans are found in coffee “cherries”, which grow on trees cultivated in over 70 countries, primarily in equatorial Latin America, Southeast Asia, South Asia and Africa. Green (unroasted) coffee is one of the most traded agricultural commodities in the world. Coffee is slightly acidic and can have a stimulating effect on humans due to its caffeine content. It is one of the most-consumed beverages in the world. Many studies have examined the health effects of coffee, and whether the overall effects of coffee consumption are positive or negative has been widely disputed.

 

Coffee Drinking Statistics
Total percentage of Americans over the age of 18 that drink coffee everyday 54%
Average size of coffee cup 9 ounces
Average price of an espresso-based drink $2.45
Average price for cup of brewed coffee $1.38
Total percentage of coffee drinkers who prefer their coffee black 35%
Total percentage of coffee consumption that takes place during breakfast hours 65%
Total amount of money spent by importing coffee to U.S. each year $4 billion
Total percentage of coffee Brazil produces of entire worlds output 30%
Total amount of cups of coffee (9 ounces) a coffee drinker consumes daily 3.1
Total average of money spent on coffee each year by coffee drinker $164.71
Total number of U.S. daily coffee drinkers 100 million
Total number of U.S. daily coffee drinkers who drink specialty beverages (lattes, cappuccinos, mochas, etc.) 30 million
Total percentage of coffee drinkers who drink 13 or more cups of coffee each week 24%
Total percentage of coffee drinkers who go to premium places (Starbucks, Coffeebean, etc.) when they get coffee out 34%
Total percentage of people who go to lower-price outlets (Mcdonalds, Dunkin Donuts, etc.) when out 29%
Total percentage of coffee consumed between meals 30%
Total percentage of coffee drinkers who add cream and/or sugar 65%
Total amount of U.S. coffee drinkers who claim to need a cup of coffee to start their day 60%
Total percentage of coffee drinkers who say coffee makes them feel more like their self 54%
Total percentage of coffee drinkers who have a a cup within the first hour of waking up 68%
Total amount of yearly money spent on specialty coffee in the U.S. 18 billion

Introducing the 2013 Annual Phoenician Awards debuting on October 2nd at the Arizona Historical Society Museum. This magical event will benefit the Banner Health Foundation/ Cardon Children’s Medical Center. Don’t miss your chance to be a part of this amazing event! Check out more info on our blog!  http://bit.ly/14gjXWo

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http://www.pinterest.com/pin/67483694389320921/

facebook-hashtag

BY CHRISTINA WARREN 

Hashtags are coming to Facebook to help users better surface conversations.Support for the all-but-ubiquitous topic organization system was rumored in March and will roll out to a small percentage of users Wednesday. Facebook will roll out hashtags to more users in the coming weeks.

The social network wants to make it easier for users to find content already on Facebook, and functional hashtags are the first step. According to Facebook, many users already post hashtags anyway, so why not make them work. Hashtags will be both clickable and searchable, so, for example, topics like #NSALeaks or #NBAFinals will now exist.

Hashtags from other services, such as Instagram, are clickable as well. Users will also be able to compose posts directly from a hashtag feed and search results. That could make adding real-time content to specific streams easier than before.

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Twitter user Chris Messina created in 2007 the hashtag as we know it today. Twitter eventually adopted the system of organizing tweets around a certain subject into its API and its broader ecosystem. Since then, the hashtag has been adopted by other services, including Flickr, Tumblr, Google+ and even Facebook-owned Instagram.

http://mashable.com/2013/06/12/facebook-hashtag-support/

79% Of People 18-44 Have Their Smartphones With Them 22 Hours A Day

By Allison Stadd on April 2, 2013 12:00 PM

Quick: what’s the first thing you do when you wake up?

Yawn? Hit the snooze button? Go to the bathroom? Brush your teeth?

If you’re like 80% of 18-44-year-olds, the answer is “check my smartphone.”

A new IDC Research report, conducted online with data from 7,446 Android and iPhone users ages 18 to 44 during a week in March, reveals some eye-opening mobile social media intel.

Facebook sponsored the report, so our sister site AllFacebook.com has the story from that angle, if you’re interested.

But here’s the lowdown from a less Facebook-specific perspective:

49% of the entire U.S. population uses a smartphone. By 2017, the percent of smartphone users is expected to reach 68%.

Four out of five smartphone users check their phones within the first 15 minutes of waking up. 80% of those say it’s the first thing they do in the morning.

79% of smartphone users have their phone on or near them for all but two hours of their waking day; 63% keep it with them for all but one hour. A full quarter of respondents couldn’t recall a single time of the day when their phone wasn’t in the same room as them.

Friday through Sunday, smartphone users spend 163 minutes communicating and using social media on their phones. Monday through Thursday, they spend 87 minutes.

So weekends are more social than ever, probably because social media is just that – social, connecting people in person and from afar online. And as Shea shared recently, another study showed that smartphone owners are considerably more social than their desktop counterparts.

The average number of social/communication apps that smartphone users have on their phones is 7.4.

The most common sentiment regarding smartphone is one of “connectedness,” far surpassing “overwhelmed,” “stressed out,” “burdened/anxious,” or “lonely.”

That connectedness engendered by smartphone use is followed closely by excitement, curiosity, and productivity.

Basically, smartphones have become pocketable personal computers rather than cell phones. And no matter the social networking you’re doing, chances are you’re doing it more deeply and often if you’re doing it on the go.

 

http://www.mediabistro.com/alltwitter/smartphones_b39001

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7 traits of a solid PR professional

By Scott Signore | Posted: April 30, 2013

 

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Having been around the block a few times, I have a good understanding of the traits of a successful PR professional. At a minimum, these are the traits we seek when filling key positions at our firm. In my humble opinion, PR people need to be…

1. Business-minded 

What’s the end goal? That’s what PR people need to consider more often than they do typically. The PR activities we execute daily put a company on the map or contribute to a larger initiative designed to help it do more business. While vague, that’s appropriately described. Before acting, a PR person needs to determine how the desired result contributes to the bigger picture of business success.

2. Flexible 

I can’t think of a career that requires as much flexibility as public relations and social media. Plans, particularly those of clients, change with nutty regularity. The successful PR pro needs to adapt and, throughout any transition, help clients achieve communications and business success no matter the direction.

Social media channels present the very obvious need to be nimble: One Facebook post can change the tone of a day. In addition to being reactive and responsive, PR pros need to have the ability to deal with whatever comes their way in a professional manner.

3. Strong writers 

To be great at PR, one needs to have writing skills. While content development has taken on a more expansive meaning of late, the foundation of the PR agency job is still in keystrokes. The ability to articulate, think creatively, and maintain a positive personality are all obvious characteristics for any profession, but in PR above average writing skills are imperative, with colleagues and clients demanding everything from compelling blog posts to finely-crafted press releases and everything in between.

4. Sponges (early in their careers, at least) 

Becoming a well rounded, consistently reliable and savvy PR person takes work. The ramp-up to achieving such a standard varies greatly depending on the individual, but no entry-level professional punches into a new job and immediately begins counseling the world’s biggest brands on high-profile communications issues.

Most newbies make an impact, but there’s a difference between that impact and the decision making of other more senior staff members. There’s so much to learn in PR on a daily basis, and that’s one of the reasons I’ve loved being a PR guy since I first interned in the field.

The best young professionals understand that experience can be gained from closely watching co-workers, carefully noting their accomplishments, and learning from their challenges.

5. Unafraid of learning more (later in their careers) 

Learning is endless and that’s so true when it comes to the ever-evolving PR field. There’s so much to gain in every interaction with a colleague or a client, and in every first-hand experience—from a methodical, well laid out plan to a crisis situation. The best PR pros know to embrace all that is happening around them and best leverage that data to improve as professionals.

6. News junkies 

PR people need to care about what is happening in the news in both their core sector and in the broader world. They need to be on top of news and trends, so that they can harness what they know to craft story ideas that best position their client, topic, etc., within the most timely, topical conversations in the media and on the street.

7. Thick-skinned 

PR people get shot-down often. It’s a common occurrence and there’s nothing wrong with that. Amid great editorial success, we get turned away pitching more than our fair share of story ideas, bylined articles, and profile pieces. While we enjoy much strategic and tactical success when working with clients, we also get shot-down presenting ideas for new programs or programmatic approaches.

It’s part of the business, and you need to roll with the circumstance. Critique and criticism are common, and it is something that needs to be embraced and learned from to survive happily at any PR firm.

http://www.prdaily.com/Main/Articles/14347.aspx

Facebook unveils changes to news feed: What does it all mean?

By Samantha Hosenkamp | Posted: March 8, 2013

 

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On Thursday, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and team unveiled highly anticipated changes to the social network’s news feed that put greater emphasis on images and personalizing information.

“How we are sharing is changing,” Zuckerberg told an audience of reporters at the company’s Menlo Park, Calif. Headquarters. “The design of news feed needs to evolve.”

The grand unveiling, which we had predicted would put at least some emphasis on brands’ use of Facebook, focused mainly the individual user’s experience. Here’s how the changes will affect your Facebook experience, and how it might affect your business or brand’s presence on the social network.

Stories through images 

As is evident by the popularity of social sites such as Pinterest and Instagram, images are all the rage. Facebook’s new design takes this into consideration—in a big way.

“News feed has become primarily about content,” Zuckerberg said during the event. “Nearly 50 percent is visual content.”

Julie Zhou, director of design at Facebook, elaborated saying, “Outside of news feed, the rest of the content is just clutter [to users].”

Here’s how this will play out: Facebook users can expect much larger, richer images in the news feed. This includes profile pictures of people in their timeline (which will include a cover photo image) and the ability to add the person as a friend directly from the news feed.

Articles from news websites will be featured in a more visually appealing way. When someone shares an article, it will resemble the table of contents of a well-curated magazine. The logo of publishers will appear in the corner.

Additionally, Places—Facebook’s location feature that lets users “check in” on their mobile phones—will be given more distinction in the new design. As Zhou explained, “We’re giving places the prominence they deserve with a map that tells you where they [the places] are and information about the place that allows you to dive in.”

Third-party apps will also be affected by the upcoming changes. In the new design, apps that are image-driven will receive more prominence. For example, images pinned to Pinterest that are also shared on Facebook will be featured more readily.

Facebook plans to create even more of a community vibe through sharing. If a number of your friends are sharing the same video, for example, Facebook will highlight this video in your feed, allowing you to play it from the feed instantly. It will also showcase all of your friends who have shared the video. Hovering over friends’ profile images with one’s mouse will reveal their comments on the video.

Your news feed, your choice

Meanwhile, the news feed will be custom-tailored to you and your interests. You’ll see upcoming events in your news feed based on what friends are doing, and places that you’ve checked into in the past.

Zhou cited NPR as an example, saying that at the end of each day—if you’ve chosen to follow NPR—Facebook will package the most popular NPR articles on Facebook that day. As Zhou says, Facebook is trying to create, “A richer, simpler, more beautiful news feed that’s focused on the things you care about.”

Another big change to the news feed, according to Chris Struhar, tech lead at Facebook, is the addition of a “switcher” in the top right-hand corner of news feeds that will enable Facebook users to jump into different feeds. This “switcher” will feature the feeds you visit most often at the top of your list of feeds.

For example, if you’re a music-lover, you can click on your music feed where you’ll find updates from bands and artists you’ve “liked.” You’ll also find information on upcoming events as well as the events and posts your friends have shared about the artists in which you’re interested.

The “all friends” feed will show friends’ posts in chronological order and the “photos feed” will show all of the photos that your friends are posting.

Your “following feed”—are you listening, brand managers?—will show every post from pages and public figures you’ve “liked”. For example, if you follow a certain band or news outlet, you’ll see all its posts in your “following feed.” The posts will be featured in chronological order to “make sure that content publishers know that fans can see every post they make,” explained Struhar.

And for those of you who just want to see the pretty pictures, there will be a “photos feed” that will only feature images from you and your friends.

A more unified mobile/desktop experience

Facebook users can expect a more mobile-inspired Web design, meaning, that people who use Facebook’s mobile app will have an experience that’s more like that of using Facebook on a desktop or tablet, according to Chris Cox, vice president of product at Facebook.

It will be easier to navigate from page to page without having to repeatedly visit the home page, Cox explained. Additionally, on mobile, a news story “bubble” will make it possible to stay in your news feed without having to scroll off the page to look at a specific story.

The new design will feature a “tray” that lets users see who’s online and view messages from people in the side bar that was once difficult to view on mobile. This design will be consistent for developers and publishers and new users won’t have to relearn how to use Facebook on mobile.

So what does this mean for brands?

Facebook, quite intentionally it seems strayed from explaining—at least in any great detail—what brands can expect from Facebook’s new design. Nor did any members of the Facebook team mention Graph Search in any capacity.

But here are some things to consider:

• Articles: As mentioned, the new design will feature articles in a way that resembles a well-curated magazine. That means images accompanying articles will be more prominently displayed along with a description of the article. The publisher’s logo will be given more prominence as well.

• Places: When a friend checks into a business or store on Facebook, his or her other friends will see larger map pictures than before in their news feed as well as additional information about the place.

• Following feed: Brand posts will be featured in this feed, but the question is, will people switch over to check on organizations and celebrities when they’re reading updates from friends and family.

Forbes believes this new design will, “provide a richer palette for advertisers,” and that Facebook is providing more opportunities for companies to reach people in more “visually engaging” ways.

 

http://www.prdaily.com/Main/Articles/14005.aspx

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Hidden Benefits of Social Media Marketing: Why Your Strategy May Be Working Better Than You Think

Stephanie Chandler, Contributor

Most businesses venture into social media expecting to see a big return on investment. The hope is that new customers

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will come in droves, and that the benefits and revenue generation will be huge. However, this is rarely the case. It takes time to build momentum with social media, and the benefits aren’t always as obvious as we would like.

If you’re feeling a bit skeptical about social media marketing and whether or not it’s worth the effort, following are some reasons why it may be working better than you realize.

1. Brand Recognition – One of the most powerful ways to use social media is as a brand-building tool. With social media, you get to decide how you want to position your company and what you want people to know about what you do. With consistent effort and great content, you can build a reputation for your brand around your company’s values, benefits, and advantages.

2. Community – There is nothing like social media when it comes to cultivating a community. When your followers become part of your community, you gain instant access to them. That means you can find out what challenges they are facing and what they like and don’t like about your offerings. You can engage in ongoing dialog that can be more valuable than any kind of paid market research.

3. Repeat Exposure – There is an old marketing adage that says it takes six to eight exposures to a product before a customer decides to buy. A clear benefit of social media is repeat exposure with your network. You have the opportunity to remind them over and over again about what you have to offer, which can shorten your sales cycles dramatically.

4. Authority – For coaches, consultants, authors, speakers, and other service-based businesses, social media can be very powerful in helping you establish authority in your field—making you the go-to resource for your target audience to seek out for help. Share great content, answer questions, andserve your audience, and you will inevitably build loyal fans.

5. Influence – As your following increases, your influence grows. Having a substantial social media audience creates a snowball effect that can attract new customers, media interviews, joint venture partnerships, and all kinds of other opportunities. It’s a bit like when you see a crowd hovered around something. You can’t help but want to see what all the fuss is about, so a large audience will only attract more interest.

6. Website Traffic – Many people don’t realize that social media can be a leading traffic generator. When you share blog posts, videos and other content from your website, you give your audience a reason to click through and visit your site. Once there, you have the opportunity to inspire those visitors to take action by inviting them to sign up for your mailing list, make a purchase, or call to schedule a free consultation. Install traffic monitoring service, such asGoogle Analytics, and if you are committed to your social media efforts, you will clearly see that social media brings traffic. Also, make sure that your visitors receive a clear call to action when they visit your site so that you can convert that extra traffic into business opportunities.

7. Ahead of the Curve – Whether you realize it or not, your prospects and clients are checking to see if you are engaging in social media. I always find it a bit odd when I’m investigating a potential service provider online and I can’t locate a social media presence or worse, I find Facebook pages that haven’t been updated in months, empty Twitter feeds, and a clear lack of interest in engaging. Social media isn’t a fad and it’s not going away. Even if it’s not your top priority, if you stay current with activity, your prospects will notice.

8. Mindshare with Lurkers – There may be days when you wonder if anyone is paying attention to your social media networks. But if your efforts are consistent, I guarantee that more people are paying attention than you realize. Give it time and you’ll start to understand what’s happening behind the anonymity of the internet. You will eventually hear from people who say, “I’ve been following you on Twitter for ages. I love your posts!”

9. Competitive Advantage – The reality is that most of your competitors aren’t likely doing a very good job with social media (most companies aren’t), which gives you the chance to stand out. Also consider the flip side. If you avoid social media, you leave a big opening that allows your competitors to capture your audience.

10. Big Wins – While many businesses large and small are trying to justify the cost and time investment for managing social media marketing, an important benefit often gets overlooked: Big Wins. For example, if someone from LinkedIn connects you with a significant government contract, then that would certainly qualify as a Big Win. If a major media outlet finds you on Twitter and interviews you for a national article, then that is also a Big Win—one that you can’t measure based on revenues directly generated.

Big Wins don’t happen often, but when they do, they make it all worthwhile. It’s easy to forget results like these six months down the road you’re trying to assess whether your social media efforts are paying off. But that one contract you landed could cover your social media marketing costs for years. And that major media interview could lead to subsequent interviews and a line item on your resume that impresses a corporate sponsor three years from now. Never forget to factor in the Big Wins in social media.

http://onforb.es/12KGcVv

 

 

 

 

4 myths about PR agencies spreading across college campuses

By Ryan McShane | Posted: January 15, 2013

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I’ve had many opportunities recently to work with members of the Public Relations Students Society of America nationwide as part of my industry service.

During mentor sessions, students often describe their job-hunting progress and feelings toward different areas of public relations. It is evident that many myths are still looming across campuses, and I’m here to teach from my experience.

MYTH: An agency is always the best career starter 

I have several arguments why most students should start their careers with an agency. Agencies help young professionals to discover their talents, broaden their knowledge, and develop relationships across the industry.

That said, several of my friends and colleagues have started their careers in-house and have achieved great success in doing so. Ultimately, agency public relations should be on your radar, but evaluate each job opportunity independently to find the right fit for you and your growth.

MYTH: Any agency will do 

Again, I’ll concede that having agency experience on your résumé will help you gain future employment. As an internship director, it’s comforting to find candidates with prior agency internships under their belts, because it shows these folks likely have experienced (and survived) the fast-paced environment that faced them.

Pace aside, many agencies do not observe ethics and best practices, and some of those flaws may follow you in the form of bad habits or a “what not to do” case study. Don’t be that case study.

MYTH: Agencies are short-term jobs 

This is a myth that I often hear when working with students and young professionals. It’s true that agency turnover is generally more volatile than in-house. Because of some of the things I mentioned above, agency practitioners often find opportunities to specialize in particular fields of interest.

However, many practitioners are cut out for a long-term career in agency public relations. Senior management often rewards this loyalty, as it sends a positive message to clients and the rest of the staff. A long-term agency path also enables you to maintain the fast-paced environment and diversified workload that many practitioners need to remain professionally hungry.

MYTH: Serving multiple clients will broaden my skills 

Benefits of working on multiple client accounts include learning different sectors and honing time management skills. Conversely, young professionals who are staffed across too many accounts are unable to completely immerse themselves into their clients’ businesses and needs.

In addition, working with too many clients will likely limit growth opportunities. Imagine being staffed across four to five clients. After monitoring for coverage, clipping placements, and building media lists, you’d likely need to repeat the same process for your next client to keep up with the workload.

Many agencies lose great young talent, because they limited their professional development. However, other agencies recognize the importance of challenging their staff on a daily basis—limiting their accounts plays a big part of that vision.

 

http://www.prdaily.com/Main/Articles/13568.aspx

 

October is National Bullying Prevention Month. Raise awareness like this news anchor did. 

 

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